Like Mexican-Style Lagers? Here are 11 Craft Beers You Should Try

Chances are, you’ve occasionally thrown back a few bottles of a popular Mexican amber lager. Maybe you drank them before you got into craft beer and now they make you nostalgic, or maybe you harbor dreams of being the Most Interesting Man  — or Woman — in the World. Whatever the reason, the popularity of Mexican-style lagers persists even among seasoned craft beer drinkers.

But what is a Mexican-style lager in the first place? The category does not explicitly appear in the Beer Judge Certification Program or Great American Beer Festival style guidelines. Tracking down the roots of this summer quencher requires a brief history lesson.

Roots of the Mexican-style Lager

Modern Mexican lagers find their origin in the late 19th century when German and Austrian immigrants began brewing the beers of their homeland in Mexico. When Austria’s Maximilian I declared himself emperor of Mexico in 1864, he brought his nation’s newly beloved Vienna lager with him. The beer proved more popular in Mexico than Maximilian, who was executed just a few years later. The Vienna lager became the dominant beer in Mexico entering the 20th century.

The Viennese lager is widely regarded as an original lager style. The beer shared its name with the Austrian city where brewer Anton Dreher first brewed it with an isolated lager yeast, revolutionary for its time. The combination of the new lager yeast and the invention of high-temperature-controlled malting yielded a reddish beer, from the Vienna malt that was clean tasting due to the yeast. As the taste for lighter-flavored beers spread throughout Mexico and the rest of the world in the 20th Century, the character and color of these traditional lagers changed with the times. Today, Vienna-style lagers vary quite widely in color and body, a development that can be seen in today’s import offerings.

Craft Brewers Put a Spin on Mexican-style Lagers

Both traditional and modern versions of Mexican-style lagers have been embraced by small and independent craft brewers here in the United States. If you’re planning a Cinco de Mayo party, check out one of these Mexican-style lagers brewed north of the border.

Ska Brewing | Mexican Logger

Ska’s cleverly named Mexican Logger was the first of the American craft Mexican-style lagers, launched in 1999. The Colorado brewery has made quite a success of this 5.2% ABV beer, winning a silver medal at GABF in 2015 in the American-Style or International-Style Pilsener category, and winning bronze in the same field in 2016. Co-founder Dave Thibodeau explains the founders used to be closeted Pacifico drinkers, which lead to their development of an American version of the classic summer style. “With Mexican Logger,” he explains, “we took a style we loved, one-upped it a bit, and threw a craft spin to make it our own.”

Oskar Blues Brewery | Beerito Mexican Lager

Just one year old, Beerito has already become a national favorite for those seeking an all-day summer beer with a Mexican flair. While it boasts the lowest alcohol level on this list at 4% ABV, it’s certainly not low in character. Oskar Blues, the brewery that created Ten Fidy, Old Chub and Dale’s Pale Ale, wasn’t going to skimp on flavor. Aiming for a light beer with deep complexity, the brewery achieved it with a carefully chosen grain bill comprised of German and Colorado-grown malts that produce toasty, nutty flavors complemented by plum and honey notes and crisp German hops.

Great Lakes Brewing Company | Grandes Lagos

Cleveland’s venerable Great Lakes Brewing Company is known for brewing classic European lager and ale styles. Its beers are characterized by refinement and quality rather than daring experimentation, so it was surprising to everyone when it announced in early 2016 a new year-round brew would be a Mexican-style lager brewed with hibiscus flowers. The new 5.4% ABV brew is the more extroverted cousin of its esteemed Eliot Ness Amber Lager, a classic Vienna lager. Where Eliot Ness showcases class, Grandes Lagos goes for charisma, offering lightly tart and sweet floral aromas and flavors from the hibiscus and a charming soft pink glow.

21st Amendment Brewery | El Sully

Named after 21st Amendment co-founder and brewmaster Shaun O’Sullivan, El Sully was inspired by the popular Mexican beers O’Sullivan drank while growing up near the beach in Southern California. It started out as a draft-only brew at the San Francisco taproom before making the jump to cans in 2015. This 4.8% ABV quencher uses German Pilsener malt for a clean, refined base, with just a bit of flaked maize to lighten the body. A Mexican lager yeast strain produces subtle spicy, herbal notes. O’Sullivan said he likes to tell people, “El Sully is what Modelo dreams of when it goes to bed at night.”

Tractor Brewing Company | New Mexican Lager

Brand-spanking-new in 16-ounce cans for May 2017, New Mexican Lager pays tribute to Tractor Brewing’s border-state heritage. The artwork for the cans features a New Mexico landscape and was created by Albuquerque artist David Santiago, who has designed a number of the brewery’s labels. At 5.6% ABV, this lager is designed to be light enough for the dry weather of the Southwest, while having the body to stand up to hearty borderland cuisine. The brewery claims the golden brew is neither Mexican nor American, but an homage to both traditions that is distinctly New Mexican.

Anchor Brewing | Los Gigantes

Mexican beer and the great American pastime come together in the newest offering from the Bay Area’s esteemed Anchor Brewing. Los Gigantes Mexican-Style Lager is a collaboration between the brewery and Major League Baseball’s San Francisco Giants franchise and marks the second beer to come from the partnership. The first crack of the bat is the sound that signals summer’s arrival for baseball fans and Anchor hopes this 4.5% ABV refresher will taste just like that. Anchor’s first beer offered in 16-ounce. cans, this light lager is brewed with pale malt and flaked maize and seasoned with Cluster and Tettnang hops.

Flying Dog Brewery | Numero Uno Summer Cerveza

Edgy East Coast brewery Flying Dog got the idea for this lager brewed with agave nectar and lime peel from one of its employees, who suggested the brew at the company’s annual retreat. Originally released as Agave Cerveza in 2014, the beer was intended to be a limited seasonal offering but did so well it was added to the year-round portfolio the next year as Summer Cerveza. Brewmaster Ben Clark says more than one-third of the malt bill is comprised of flaked maize, leading to “a crisp, refreshing beer.”

Lone Tree Brewing | Summer Siesta

Colorado’s Lone Tree won a silver medal at the Great American Beer Festival in 2015 in the American-Style Lager or Light Lager category for Summer Siesta, and the first-ever cans of the beer should be rolling down the canning line as this article goes to publish. Head brewer Josh Wast says the beer is brewed with Pilsner and six-row malt and “a huge amount of flaked corn.” Sitting at a comfortable 5.3% ABV, Summer Siesta is fermented with a very clean lager yeast and finished with German hops for a crisp, refreshing take on this south-of-the-border style.

Lucky Star Brewery | Ojos Locos Mexican Lager

Travel to Miamisburg, Ohio, to try this draft-only lager (the brewery is planning to bottle it soon) and you just might get the most authentic Mexican drinking experience on this list, because Lucky Star’s taproom is modeled after a Mexican cantina. Authentic tacos, quesadillas and house-made salsas provide appropriate culinary pairings for this 4.8% ABV lager. Ojos Locos is brewed with a Mexican yeast that dries the beer out, leaving an easy gateway beverage for the macro beer drinkers who come in asking for their favorite national brands, says owner and brewmaster Glen Perrine. This clean fermentation profile is accentuated by Saaz hops for a crisp beer that is best enjoyed on Lucky Star’s “Pink Party Patio” when weather allows.

Epic Brewing | Los Locos Lager

Inspired by the audacious Mexican restaurant Los Chingones (Google it) not far from Epic’s Denver brewery, Los Locos Lager is truly unique. The sunny brew features sea salt and lime, making this beer perfect for a day at the beach. Los Locos was initially intended to be a limited collaboration with Los Chingones and was first only available at the restaurant, but Epic brewers soon realized they had a winner on their hands, canned it, and made it available across their distribution territory.

Indeed Brewing | Mexican Honey Imperial Lager

When this Minneapolis brewery first received a shipment of Mexican orange blossom honey, the sticky ingredient wasn’t intended to headline one of its beers. But according to Indeed’s head brewer Josh Bischoff, “We were so impressed with the characteristics of it, we decided to brew a beer to showcase it. Since the honey is from Mexico, the beer snowballed from there and created itself.” This beer clocks in at 8% ABV, and isn’t at all what you expect from a typical Mexican-style lager, providing what the brewery describes as “a citrus and floral fiesta,” one probably better suited to toasting the close of your Cinco de Mayo party than kicking it off.

The post Like Mexican-Style Lagers? Here are 11 Craft Beers You Should Try appeared first on CraftBeer.com.

 

Boise Beer Travel: The Quiet Ascent of a Rich Beer Culture

 

It’s been said that if Portland, Oregon, and Bend, Oregon, had a baby, it would be Boise, Idaho. There’s merit to this claim. Boise residents are an outdoor-loving lot. The area’s warm, dry climate is conducive to exploring nearly 200 miles of hiking and biking trails minutes from downtown. The Bogus Basin ski area is a short drive from the city. Trout fishing is as close as the Boise River, which runs through downtown. A 25-mile multi-use path meanders along the river’s edge.

 

Boise residents are enamored of all things local, especially beer. If the Boise beer scene has little visibility outside of Idaho, this is due more to the city’s geographic isolation than a lack of options. In recent years, the city has quietly amassed an impressive collection of breweries and brewpubs. New brewing businesses are in the works, and recent expansions are evidence of a thriving beer culture.

Boise Beer Travel: Exploring Downtown

A great way to begin exploring “The City of Trees” is with a stroll through Freak Alley. The back walls of a series of buildings along intersecting alleyways sport a sizable collection of murals in an attention-grabbing diversity of styles. In the heart of the downtown district, Boise Brewing opened in 2014 following a successful Kickstarter campaign in which investors received stock in the brewery. Dividends are paid in beer. The interior of the blue and mustard-colored concrete block structure is dominated by the open brewhouse. Tall, stainless steel vessels loom over the bar and tables. The brewery’s rich and roasty Black Cliff’s American Stout has won back-to-back GABF gold medals. If you love talking beer, you’re in the right place. The four female beer servers are all homebrewers. Boise Brewing opened in 2014.

It’s a short walk to the Bittercreek Alehouse, Boise’s premier gastropub. The food is well-prepared and the 44 draught beers have a largely local focus. In fact, the beer menu lists the distance to each brewery from the restaurant. Also nearby is a great breakfast spot named BACON. The name says it all.

On the fringes of downtown, Payette Brewing resides in a handsome new facility along the Boise River Greenbelt. Since beginning operations in 2010, Payette has grown into one of Idaho’s largest and most respected brewing businesses. It’s hard to miss the expansive modern industrial building with a huge mountain mural painted on an exterior wall. The 60-barrel production brewhouse is visible through a glass wall at the far end of the airy tasting room. Nineteen house beers include three full-time IPAs, reflecting local beer enthusiasts’ obsession with hoppy ales.

Payette Brewing

Payette Brewing sits along the Boise River Greenbelt.

North of downtown, Boise’s historic North End is considered “Old Boise.” As you travel between the neighborhood’s two breweries, take some time to explore the leafy side streets lined with lovingly restored century-old homes. Tucked in the corner of a large shopping complex called the “Marketplace,” Cloud 9 Brewery offers a comfy retreat. A pleasant outdoor patio is warmed by space heaters for cool weather imbibing. The back half of the modestly-sized interior consists of the glassed-in four-barrel brewhouse. There’s an emphasis on locally-sourced ingredients for both the made-from-scratch kitchen creations and the half-dozen rotating specialty beers that supplement six full-time offerings.

 

Highlands Hollow Brewhouse, the granddaddy of Boise breweries, has operated as a brewpub since 1992, but its restaurant roots date from the 1960s. Located at the base of the road to the Bogus Basin Ski Area, “The Hollow” has long been a popular refueling stop following a day of mountain recreation. The atmospheric brick and dark wood indoor space includes a circular fireplace in the middle of the dining room, a collection of vintage ski posters and a well-worn ambiance that can’t be reproduced. The house beers rotate regularly, but are largely styles of British origin.

Boise Breweries Outside the City Center

Boise’s energized beer scene has given rise to a growing number of brewing business scattered in outlying areas. Garden City, despite its bucolic moniker, is a mostly industrial enclave about five miles from downtown Boise. Cheap leases and free water have fueled the opening of a cluster of breweries in recent years. Biking the river trail to Garden City for a tasting session is a popular weekend activity.

Sockeye Brewing

Sockeye Brewing is about 10 miles outside of the Boise city center.

For a small mom-and-pop operation, Barbarian Brewing gets a disproportionate amount of attention among local craft beer devotees. Boise’s most talked-about brewery opened in 2015 with a unique focus on sour and barrel-aged creations. The brewery’s two-room tasting area is a small and inviting space to sample an assortment of 15 sour and “clean” house beers. The most popular is Beta Wolf 2.0, a sour IPA brewed with mango and passionfruit. Seven rotating taps feature experimental creations such as Folkvang, a tart Berliner Weisse made with strawberries, cardamom and rosewater. Barbarian is gearing up for the opening of a downtown Boise taproom in summer, 2017.

Just a mile down the road, two-year-old Bella Brewing occupies an unpretentious concrete block structure. A few tables and a bar populate the indoor space, with brewing vessels lined up along interior walls. As is the norm in hop-intensive Boise, the IPA is the most popular of the 13 house beers which run the gamut of pale, amber, dark, tart and fruited fermentations.

About 10 miles west of the city center, oft-decorated Sockeye Brewing has built an attractive restaurant and imposing production brewing facility. The vast mountain lodge-style dining room features log beams and columns and a spacious outdoor patio. A 15-beer draught collection includes six core beers of familiar styles augmented with seasonal, specialty, sour and barrel-aged offerings. The brewing operation, which is among the state’s largest, is housed in a separate structure behind the restaurant. Sockeye also operates a second, smaller-capacity brewpub closer to downtown.

Mad Swede

Jerry and Susie Larson are the owners of Mad Swede Brewing in Boise.

With a regional mall just a mile away, the dining room of Edge Brewing Company does a brisk business with shoppers and families. Surprisingly, the brewpub’s best-selling beer is the big, burly, 9% ABV Obligatory DIPA. That suits the Edge brew crew just fine. They make no apologies for their fondness for high-gravity, indulgently-hopped ales. At any given time, you’re likely to find three or four 9%-plus beers on tap. If imperial-strength ales aren’t your forte, you’ll find an assortment of more approachable offerings such as the clean and agreeable Vienna Lager.

It’s fitting to call the beers of Mad Swede Brewing Company “well-engineered.” Co-founder and brewer Jerry Larson was a long-time mechanical engineer before he and wife Susie opened what is currently Boise’s newest brewery in 2016. Larson gets the most out of his fine-tuned 15-barrel brewing system, producing bright, well-attenuated, satisfying ales. The eight house beers dispensed in the small cheery tasting room have a bias toward dark styles. As the closest brewery to the airport, Mad Swede is a great introduction to the Boise beer scene, or a final stop if you’re departing the city by plane.

The post Boise Beer Travel: The Quiet Ascent of a Rich Beer Culture appeared first on CraftBeer.com.

 

Brewing books advised by the Beeradvocate

True Beer: Inside the Small, Neighborhood Nanobreweries Changing the World of Craft Beer

Author Timothy Sprinkle takes readers behind the scenes of Colorado nanobreweries to reveal the realities, with a nuanced perspective on this narrow but growing segment.

Hoptopia: A World of Agriculture and Beer in Oregon’s Willamette Valley

Author Peter Kopp traces the hop’s history from its oldest ancestor, which grew in Asia, to the first hop arriving in America millions of years later, probably in a bottle of English ale.

My Beer Year: Adventures with Hop Farmers, Craft Brewers, Chefs, Beer Sommeliers and Fanatical Drinkers as a Beer Master in Training

In this stellar example of what beer writing can be, working mother Lucy Burningham documents her experiential study plan to pass the Certified Cicerone exam within a year.

The Homebrewer’s Almanac: A Seasonal Guide to Making Your Own Beer from Scratch

From caramelized tubers to fermented acorns, the authors reveal the possibilities hiding in plain sight in your backyard or at the farmers market.

Brewing Local: American-Grown Beer

In his fourth book, Stan Hieronymus writes for brewers who want to use locally grown ingredients but aren’t sure where to start.

Complete IPA: The Guide to Your Favorite Craft BeerShelf Talker by

Beyond the classic English and American styles, author Joshua M. Bernstein indexes standout IPAs by grain, color, and strength. Fringe categories like “yeast-driven” and wood-aged get a nod, too.

Craft: The California Beer Documentary

From household names like Vinnie Cilurzo and Greg Koch, to emerging stars like Monkish Brewing’s Henry Nguyen, this doc features 80 of California’s movers and shakers speaking their mind on some hot-button issues.

Off-Centered Leadership: The Dogfish Head Guide to Motivation, Collaboration and Smart Growth

For 20 years, Sam Calagione steered Dogfish Head according to his gut, addicted to the buzz that comes with risk and uncertainty. In this book, he explains why he’s changing his ways.

Homebrew All-Stars: Top Brewers Share Their Best Techniques and Recipes

If you’ve ever sifted through a homebrewers’ forum trying to separate the experts from the blowhards, this book is for you.

The Meanings of Craft Beer

In Evan Rail’s latest Kindle Single, he explores the linguistic and non-linguistic meanings of a phrase many Americans use without thinking: craft beer.

The Beer Geek Handbook

The snobs out there can make beer seem unapproachable for “noobs.” This book is author Patrick Dawson’s answer to the upturned noses among us; a dry, unapologetic survey of the craft beer lifestyle.

Food & Beer

In Food & Beer, we’re led through a day in chef Daniel Burns and Evil Twin founder/brewer Jeppe Jarnit-Bjergsø’s Michelin-starred kitchen, Luksus.

Gardening for the Homebrewer

Gardening for the Homebrewer starts out with the basics, but what makes it great is chapters on growing other fermentables—from Gruit herbs, like yarrow and juniper, to cucurbits, the key to Cucumber Saisons and Pumpkin Ales.

Beer for All Seasons: A Through-the-Year Guide to What to Drink and When to Drink It

In Beer for All Seasons, Randy Mosher reminds us that March isn’t the only month connected to the cyclical rhythm of beer throughout the year.

Blood, Sweat & Beer

In Blood, Sweat & Beer, filmmakers Chip Hiden and Alexis Irvin capture the nuances of the craft brewing community with honesty and humor.

The Hop Grower’s Handbook: The Essential Guide for Sustainable, Small-Scale Production for Home and Market

Despite the modest renaissance of hops production in eastern states, no step-by-step guide had emerged until The Hop Grower’s Handbook.

The Best Beer in the World: One Man’s Global Search for the Perfect Pint

Beer writer Mark Dredge kept getting asked, What’s the best beer in the world? Tired of stumbling through contrived answers, Dredge decided to figure it out for himself.

Oh Beautiful Beer: The Evolution of Craft Beer and Design

Why we’re reading Oh Beautiful Beer: The Evolution of Craft Beer and Design.

The Comic Book Story of Beer

Shelf Talker by

Why we’re reading The Comic Book Story of Beer.

Speed Brewing: Techniques and Recipes for Fast-Fermenting Beers, Ciders, Meads, and More

In Speed Brewing, author Mary Izett applies her chemistry background and BJCP expertise to designing original recipes that ferment in just days or weeks.

The Beer Bible

Why we’re reading The Beer Bible.

Uncle John’s Beer-Topia: A Heady Brew of Beer Miscellany

It’s clearly not for the geeks among us—the homebrew chapter is entitled “Make your own beer in two hours”—but buried in this novelty book are some legit factoids.

Mikkeller’s Book of Beer

Why we’re reading Mikkeller’s Book of Beer.

Oregon Breweries (Breweries Series)

Why we’re reading Oregon Breweries in the Breweries Series.

by

Brewing Craft Beer

All the stuff you need

Digital Thermometer Options for Beer Brewing

Digital Thermometer Options for Beer Brewing

Types of Brewing Thermometers Most brewers are familiar with the ubiquitous floating glass thermometer which comes with the vast majority of homebrew starter kits. These glass thermometers typically have a temperature range of 0-100 C (32-212 F) and can simply be dropped in the pot or mash tun and left to float. They are fairly reliable though some have questionable … Read more
My Love-Hate Relationship with Home Brew Beer Siphoning

My Love-Hate Relationship with Home Brew Beer Siphoning

Siphoning is one of the necessary evils for homebrewers. Unless you are fortunate enough to have a large RIMS/HERMS brewing system with wort pumps and conical fermenters, and pumps for transferring between fermenters, you have probably had to siphon your beer at some point. We siphon to move wort to the fermenter, we siphon to transfer beer to a secondary, … Read more
Build A DIY RIMS System

Build A DIY RIMS System

I recently had a chance to brew with the professionals at a local brewery. They were brewing on a SABCO Brew-Magic (15 gallon) system that they use for their weekly small batch releases. The brewer explained the components and how they all worked together. The wort would circulate throughout the mash process and that the temperature would be kept constant … Read more
Aging of Craft Beers

Aging of Craft Beers

Er is veel te doen over het conditioneren van craft beer. Elke brouwer heeft wel zijn geheime methode van opslaan om het bier optimaal van geur en smaak uit de fles te krijgen. Er wordt veel onzin verteld en geschreven over hoe bier rijpt en steeds beter wordt naarmate je het langer bewaart. Wat is waar en wat is niet … Read more
Beer Adjuncts

Beer Adjuncts

Malts
Unmalted grains such as corn, rice, rye, oats, barley, and wheat are called adjuncts. They are used in brewing beer and produce beers with added body and a greater brilliancy. Adjuncts also contribute to the flavor of the beer, for example, rice has a very neutral aroma and taste, while corn results in a full flavored beer and wheat adds … Read more
How Long To Ferment When Learning How To Make Beer?

How Long To Ferment When Learning How To Make Beer?

Yeast
When you are first learning how to make beer, you will see information about primary fermentation and secondary fermentation. It is common for new brewers to wonder just how long it takes to ferment beer. The answer can vary, and there really isn’t one right answer. Many factors influence this, and it comes down to whether you will secondary ferment … Read more
Blichmann BrewEasy RIMS Brewing System Review Part 2 – Brewing Beer

Blichmann BrewEasy RIMS Brewing System Review Part 2 – Brewing Beer

BrewEasy during Mash Recirculation In Part 2 of my Blichmann BrewEasy detailed review I brew some beer, and record my experience and lessons learned with the new system. Last week in Part 1, I gave an overview of the system specs, setup and my first impressions. [Note – this is a very long post – and full disclosure: Blichmann Engineering … Read more
Converting a Refrigerator Into a Kegerator

Converting a Refrigerator Into a Kegerator

Most of us beer enthusiasts have an extra refrigerator in the garage or somewhere around the house. It’s the phenomenon that takes place when our spouse has the dire need to get a new refrigerator. We might not think we need one at the time. But, now we know what to do with it. Make a kegerator out of it … Read more
Between Brews: Mounting and Motorizing Your Grain Mill

Between Brews: Mounting and Motorizing Your Grain Mill

I really, really like my Monster Mill 3+. It is a little heavy to carry around, though, and it feels unstable when sitting on a bucket with a heavy drill motor hanging off the side. I knew that I wanted to make a permanent mounting with a fixed drive for it. That meant that I had to select a suitable … Read more
10 Tips for Beginning Homebrewers

10 Tips for Beginning Homebrewers

My first homebrewing purchase was a book. Before I ever made a drop of beer, I read Charlie Papazian’s book, The Joy of Homebrewing cover to cover. Looking back, I realize that only an infinitesimal amount of that valuable tome actually stuck in my brain that first time through. I’ve read it many times since and something new “clicks” every … Read more
Between Brews: Controlling Gas Fired Burners Pt 2

Between Brews: Controlling Gas Fired Burners Pt 2

In the first segment I described the necessary plumbing and valves to make low pressure gas (either LP or natural gas) burners electrically controllable. To achieve control, we need to be able to apply 24VAC when we want flame, and to remove the voltage source when we don’t want flame. In this segment I will show various means by which … Read more
Build A DIY RIMS System

Build A DIY RIMS System

I recently had a chance to brew with the professionals at a local brewery. They were brewing on a SABCO Brew-Magic (15 gallon) system that they use for their weekly small batch releases. The brewer explained the components and how they all worked together. The wort would circulate throughout the mash process and that the temperature would be kept constant … Read more
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Websites & Stores

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Craft Beer Newbie? 5 Activities to Take You from Beer Beginner to In-the-Know

Craft Beer Newbie? 5 Activities to Take You from Beer Beginner to In-the-Know
websites
You’ve been dabbling in beer for a while now, but you still consider yourself a craft beer newbie — you’ve visited some breweries, you’ve hit some beer festivals, and you’ve wandered the aisles of your better beer retailer looking for ... Read more

Brewers Cook Book

Better German Pilsner

Better German Pilsner
Lager
This recipe from Josh Weikert, author of the Beer: Simple blog is for a bare-bones, but crisp and flavorful, German Pils. The grist is simplicity itself, all Pils with just a touch of Victory to bring out a rich grainy malt flavor, and it has plenty of IBUs and hops flavor to keep it firmly in the Pilsner family. He ... Read more

Scratch Brewing’s Dead Leaves and Carrots Beer Recipe

Scratch Brewing's Dead Leaves and Carrots Beer Recipe
Fruit & Herbal
Published: 2016-11-01
This is one of Scratch Brewing (Ava, Illinois) customers’ all-time favorites. It’s a lightly bready English bitter with a touch of smoke and a dry, crisp finish. It was inspired by the crisp crunch of fall leaves and that dry, almost toasted paper aroma. The oak leaves add extra bitterness and tannins, and the carrots add extra ... Read more

Make Your Best Scottish Light Ale (60/-)

Make Your Best Scottish Light Ale (60/-)
Ales
If it’s November, it’s time to brew the beer that will carry me through the winter holiday parties. And if you’re like me, you want beer on tap that will be flavorful but also low in ABV so that your guests can still make their way home safely. So what’s a brewer to do? In my case, I make ... Read more

How to Make Beer Clone Recipes

How to Make Beer Clone Recipes
Ales
Although I make a vast majority of my own beer, I still like to head to my local tap house and have a fresh, quality craft beer from time to time. I benefit from this in a couple of ways and so can you. First, it helps with the continuous education of my passion for beer making by discussing the ... Read more

Beers Made with Barrel-Aged Coffee Beans are ‘Blowing People’s Minds’

Beers Made with Barrel-Aged Coffee Beans are ‘Blowing People’s Minds’
When we think of barrel-aged beer, we usually think of beer that’s been brewed and then left to age in whiskey or wine barrels. But a few brewers are putting a new twist on that and spinning things around the other way: Introducing a beer, brewed with barrel-aged coffee beans. If you’re not into coffee, you may not have heard ... Read more

How to Make Hard Cider – The Easy Way

How to Make Hard Cider – The Easy Way
Cider
I’ve never been a big cider fan, but a friend sent me a recipe he said I must try, so I made my first batch and it actually came out great! I thought I would share the recipe and method with you so you can give it a try. This is a simple recipe made from apple juice, though you ... Read more

Brewers Find Bold Beer Flavors in Barrels Beyond Bourbon

Brewers Find Bold Beer Flavors in Barrels Beyond Bourbon
The number of craft breweries with some level of barrel aging program has risen dramatically over the past decade, with most gravitating toward used whiskey casks, particularly bourbon, to add new oaky, vanilla and boozy flavor elements to select batches. But whiskey certainly is far from being the only game in town, especially as brewers experiment with oak containers that ... Read more

Brewing with Chocolate, Methods and Process

Brewing with Chocolate, Methods and Process
Chocolate and beer are two of the best substances in the world, so they can only be better together, right? There are a number of ways to infuse the goodness of cacao, along with all the antioxidant power packed into those little beans, into your homebrew. Armed with sharp taste buds and a hint of imagination, the home brewer can ... Read more

6 Beginner Beer Recipes and Styles

6 Beginner Beer Recipes and Styles
Blond, Dark, Stout
We find ourselves in a golden era of beer. There are more breweries open in the United States than ever before, with more and more opening every day. Countless styles and amazing quality are at our fingertips, and tips of our tongues, in nearly every city in the country. As homebrewers, this massive quantity of great beer can be inspiring, ... Read more

Run to the Pils Recipe

Run to the Pils Recipe
Lager
Jeremy Myers, head brewer and co-owner of Neshaminy Creek Brewing Company (Croydon, Massachusetts) notes that there are no brewing salts added for mash pH adjustment. This recipe follows the Reinheitsgebot, so he uses acidulated malt. ALL-GRAIN Batch size: 5 gallons (19 liters) Efficiency: 83% Attenuation: 83% OG: 1.049 (12.17°P) FG: 1.009 (2.14°P) IBUs: 36 ABV: 5.34%

MALT/GRAIN BILL

6.83 ... Read more

Make Your Best Southern English Brown

Make Your Best Southern English Brown
Ales, Dark

Style

The southern English brown ale or London brown ale is a style that’s rarely seen on the shelves these days, but it’s still a good one to have in your arsenal. It’s a beer that drinks a lot “bigger” than it actually is, with a deep flavor palate and body but relatively little alcohol. It occupies a middle ... Read more

Make Your First Batch an IPA

Make Your First Batch an IPA
IPA, IPA beer
So you’ve decided to take up homebrewing. You’ve bought starter equipment (or received a kit as a gift). You have a reference book or two. And you’ve obviously found the Craft Beer & Brewing website. You’ve used your acute need for bottles as justification for buying more beer. All that’s left is to pick a recipe and get to ... Read more
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